Retirement Plan Custodians

NAMCOA can work with virtually any record-keeper/custodian, as in the case of retirement plans, the plan sponsor has the final choice and selects their record-keeper/custodian. NAMCOA has never received commissions from any custodian, of any type, our competitive fees can be paid out of plan assets and/or be direct-billed. 

In alphabetical offer, the retirement plan custodians we currently work with are:

  • Ascensus
  • AssetMark
  • Empower
  • ePlan
  • Fidelity
  • Paychex
  • SEI Private Trust Company
  • The Pacific Financial Group

Collectively, these custodians are also Platform Managers and provide related investment advisory and performance measurement services that may be provided through their third-party platform. These Platform Managers are responsible for managing model portfolios, taking into account each client risk profile and input from NAMCOA Advisor.

2021 Interactive Broker Awards

So for Interactive Brokers, industry Awards in 2021 are not in any short supply. One of the custodians NAMCOA uses, has achieved yet another award from Barons, for being the Best Online Broker – 5 out of 5 stars#1 for Active Traders, #1 for Information, #1 for International and #1 for Trading.

Interactive Brokers is a global custodian of client assets, and offers a transparent, low commissions and financing rates, support for best price execution, and stock yield enhancement program help minimize costs to maximize client returns.

With Interactive Brokers, our clients can invest globally in stocks, options, futures, currencies, bonds and funds from a single integrated account. Multiple currencies are available and assets can be denominated in multiple currencies.

Through Interactive Brokers, we can access market data 24 hours a day and six days a week in 135 Markets, 33 Countries and 23 currencies.

Other 2021 industry Awards for Interactive Brokers noted below.

Client Note April 2021

May 10, 2021

The close of April brings us 1/3 of the way through 2021.  After a very rapid start in January and subsequent pullback, April was a strong month across all asset classes.  For the month, the S&P500 gained 5.8%, gold gained 3.8%, corporate bonds gained 1% and long-term Treasuries gained 2.4%. Stocks in Asia have weakened while European shares have been catching up to the US.  Portfolios gained in April and the average Moderate portfolio is up 6% year to date.

We are still in a “value over growth” market, where traditional industries like materials, industrials, financials, utilities are outpacing the growth areas like technology and biotech.  We had been in a market were large-cap growth” (aka technology, aka FAANG) and small-cap stocks had been dominating, but since mid-February markets have been driven by dividend paying stocks and other cyclical areas.  This will likely continue until evidence that we are not going to grow as rapidly as investors currently believe.   Friday’s massive miss in unemployment (1million new jobs expected; 266,000 actual) may be the first data point that could show a much more moderate pace of growth going forward.

The still high expectations of rapid growth see inflation data as evidence that the economy is about to run red-hot.   If we read below the headlines, we can see that commodity prices like lumber are being driven by more than US housing demand.  A years-ago beetle infestation in Canada has limited US lumber imports; sawmill shutdowns due to Covid, AND housing have been sources of supply disruption.  The combination has pushed prices to extreme levels.  China is the world’s largest consumer of raw materials.  China’s early control of Covid-19 and truly massive stimulus spending (approximately 10% of GDP in 2020) has underpinned demand for such commodities and agricultural products.    This makes much more sense than inflation driven by US aspirations to get back to pre-Covid levels, which saw sub-2% growth for several years.  In addition, supply chain disruption due to a varied array of local shutdown conditions across the US has made year over year comparisons and identifying specific bottlenecks a challenge.   Currently, China’s credit impulse is on the wane, while US stimulus takes the reins in 2021.  US stimulus usually takes longer to impact the economy, however.  In the longer run, the US needs to maintain our reserve currency status—by creating enough US dollars for the rest of the world to use—but that is a topic for another day.

I expect forward-looking estimates of growth in the US to decline to more normal levels and at the same time, interest rates and inflation expectations to decline moderately.  Interest rates have been sideways now for almost 10 weeks. I will be looking for further confirmation of this in economic data into the end of the quarter.

 

Adam Waszkowski, CFA

 This commentary is not intended as investment advice or an investment recommendation. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results. Price and yield are subject to daily change and as of the specified date. Information provided is solely the opinion or our investment managers at the time of writing. Nothing in the commentary should be construed as a solicitation to buy or sell securities. Information provided has been prepared from sources deemed to be reliable but is not guaranteed by NAMCO and may not be a complete summary or statement of all available data necessary for making an investment decision. Liquid securities, such as those held within managed portfolios, can fall in value. Naples Asset Management Company, LLC is an SEC Registered Investment Adviser. For more information, please contact us at awaszkowski@namcoa.com.

IRS Boosts 2021 Income Limits for Deductible IRA Contributions

The Internal Revenue Service announced Monday income range increases in 2021 for determining eligibility to make deductible contributions to traditional Individual Retirement Arrangements, to contribute to Roth IRAs and to claim the Saver’s Credit.

However, 401(k) contribution limits for 2021 are unchanged at $19,500.

Catch-up contribution limits for employees age 50 and over remain unchanged at $6,500.

The limitation regarding SIMPLE retirement accounts remains unchanged at $13,500.  The limit on annual contributions to an IRA remains unchanged at $6,000.

As the IRS explains in Notice 2020-79, taxpayers can deduct contributions to a traditional IRA if they meet certain conditions. If during the year either the taxpayer or his or her spouse was covered by a retirement plan at work, the deduction may be reduced, or phased out, until it is eliminated, depending on filing status and income. (If neither the taxpayer nor his or her spouse is covered by a retirement plan at work, the phase-outs of the deduction do not apply.)

Here are the phase-out ranges for 2021:

  • For single taxpayers covered by a workplace retirement plan, the phase-out range is $66,000 to $76,000, up from $65,000 to $75,000.
  • For married couples filing jointly, where the spouse making the IRA contribution is covered by a workplace retirement plan, the phase-out range is $105,000 to $125,000, up from $104,000 to $124,000.
  • For an IRA contributor who is not covered by a workplace retirement plan and is married to someone who is covered, the deduction is phased out if the couple’s income is between $198,000 and $208,000, up from $196,000 and $206,000.
  • For a married individual filing a separate return who is covered by a workplace retirement plan, the phase-out range is not subject to an annual cost-of-living adjustment and remains $0 to $10,000. The income limit for the Saver’s Credit (also known as the Retirement Savings Contributions Credit) for low- and moderate-income workers is $66,000 for married couples filing jointly, up from $65,000; $49,500 for heads of household, up from $48,750; and $33,000 for singles and married individuals filing separately, up from $32,500.
  • The income phase-out range for taxpayers making contributions to a Roth IRA is $125,000 to $140,000 for singles and heads of household, up from $124,000 to $139,000. For married couples filing jointly, the income phase-out range is $198,000 to $208,000, up from $196,000 to $206,000. The phase-out range for a married individual filing a separate return who makes contributions to a Roth IRA is not subject to an annual cost-of-living adjustment and remains $0 to $10,000.

The SIMPLE catch-up limit stays unchanged at $13,500. Catch-up contributions do not apply to SEPs.

The 2020 Roth IRA contribution eligibility phase-out limits based on income have increased slightly to $198,000 to $208,000 for married-joint and $125,000 to $140,000 for singles and heads of household.

 

Client Note September 2020

Client Note                                                                                                                                                      

October 8, 2020

September saw the S&P500 slip approximately 3.8%, ending a streak of 5 positive months in a row.  While equity markets and precious metals (oddly) are moving together, our cash and bond holdings kept average portfolio declines to approximately 1.5% on the month. Year to date through September 30, the S&P 500 is up 5.6%, while our average Moderate Portfolio is up almost 10% year to date.  The fact that financial markets are up this year, despite 2020 being on track for the worst GDP contraction since 1946, is remarkable.

Estimates for 2020 GDP growth will come in around -4%, while the 2007/2008 era saw only a 2.7% contraction.  But this time markets are faring far better.  The key difference between today and 2008 is the emergency actions of the Fed.  The Fed acted far faster and far more substantially than it did in 2008.  The labor market bottomed out in February 2010 with total losses of 8.8 million jobs.  Not until May 2014 did the US recover all the jobs lost.  Currently, we have recovered half of the 22 million jobs lost.  IF, the now-slowing recovery is similar to post 2008, it could be 5 years before all jobs are recovered.  Fortunately, the S&P500 mirrors the Fed’s balance sheet growth more than the economic data.   

History shows us that markets recover more quickly than jobs or the economy.  As such, it appears equity markets have priced in a full profit recovery in the coming year.   In 2008, corporate profits bottomed almost the same time markets did.   Profits and markets grew alongside each other for several years. This time, markets have already recovered and are waiting on profits to back fill the massive valuation gap that now exists.  Because of this mis-match in timing, we could see a few more bouts of 20% gains and declines, as data/news shows economic activity slowing or increasing; as governments decide to add fiscal support or skip it; and as hot spots of the Covid virus spike and recede over the next year or longer.

Some analysts see rising inflation and higher rates coming because of economic growth.  In order to create the ‘good’ inflation (demand-pull), consumers need to spend.  They spend wages, new credit (loans/credit cards) and transfer payments (social security/welfare/stimulus checks).  Banks’ lending standards are increasing; lending is decreasing.  Aggregate wages have declined each month since May. Finally, in August the Cares Act $600/week stimulus ran out while 10 million remain unemployed, keeping pressure on consumer spending.  The Chairman of the Federal Reserve has asked Congress for fiscal stimulus to lift the economy.  As it stands now, there is no real impetus for market rates to rise, and may bode well for bond prices, as rates stay low or perhaps decline again.

My outlook for markets and rates remains the same as during the Summer.  Rates remain low and there is a good likelihood of large swings in market prices.  That outlook will remain until either a large stimulus package with money going right to consumers or control of the spread of the virus occur, maybe both.  I am expecting a post-election rally that may start mid to late October, simply because regardless of the winner, markets like certainty.  Precious metals appear to have completed their correction and a nascent rally may have started.

Adam Waszkowski, CFA

 This commentary is not intended as investment advice or an investment recommendation. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results. Price and yield are subject to daily change and as of the specified date. Information provided is solely the opinion or our investment managers at the time of writing. Nothing in the commentary should be construed as a solicitation to buy or sell securities. Information provided has been prepared from sources deemed to be reliable but is not guaranteed by NAMCO and may not be a complete summary or statement of all available data necessary for making an investment decision. Liquid securities, such as those held within managed portfolios, can fall in value. Naples Asset Management Company, LLC is an SEC Registered Investment Adviser. For more information, please contact us at awaszkowski@namcoa.com.

Client Note June 2020

As we close June and the first half of 2020, financial markets continue their rebound from the first quarter’s corona-crash.  In very volatile markets there will be many “best/worst X since Y”.  The close at 3100 on the SP500 reflects the best quarter in the sp500 since 1987, with a gain of 19.9%.  After a 36% decline off the all-time high and subsequent 40% gain, puts the SP500 at -4% year to date and -9% below the all-time highs.  Our average moderate portfolio gained almost 15% for the quarter and is up 4% on the year.  While further upside is possible but in the short term, US equity markets are in a downtrend since June 23.  On a larger time, frame, we have downtrends since June 8 and off the highs on February 19thGetting over 3200 should open the door towards 3400+, but if we lose the 3000 level, my medium-term outlook will change.  Our individual stocks continue to do very well.

International equities continue to sorely lag US equities.  European shares gained 2.5% on the month, and currently sit at -14% year to date.  Japan gained 1% and China ebbed 1.6% on the month and both fall well short of the SP500 at -7% and -9%, respectively, year to date.  Emerging markets were the winner on the month at +6% but also have made far less progress recovering post-crash, coming in at     -11% year to date. We sold the last bits of emerging and international equities towards the end of the month.

In credit markets, treasuries have dominated over all other areas of the bond markets.  The long bond/20-yr treasury ebbed by 2.25% during the month, is flat for the quarter and up a massive 20% for 2020.  Even with equivalent maturities, treasuries are outpacing investment grade and junk bonds by 5% and 17%(!) respectively.  The investment grade corporate bond etf, LQD is up 5.1% ytd, while junk bond etf, JNK is -7.7% ytd.   This disparity is due to the rapid credit deterioration seen during this severe recession.  Given this, and spike in covid19 cases, its unlikely rates will rise appreciably in the near term.  Our long treasury position was reduced late March at slightly higher prices.

Economic data released in June continue to show improvement over the April/May shutdown (naturally).    The pace at which the economy would rebound after reopening is a hot topic.  We are seeing rapid improvement in some areas but the estimates versus data are showing extremely poor forecasting ability by economists in the short term.  I am watching year over year data to see how much rebound we are getting.  If July and August data show similar growth as May and June, we could see 90% of more of the economy back by Labor Day.  The trend of economic recovery is far more important than the level.  Ideally, we will trend higher and higher until full recovery.   At the end of July, we will get the first read on GDP for the second quarter.  The Atlanta Fed current estimate has risen to   -36%. 

Looking forward, the recent spike in virus cases has opened the door to the risk that the re-opening of the economy will be slowed, as we are more likely to see county or regional shutdowns.  Continued support from the Fed and continuation of stimulus programs are critical.  A bit higher in equities may provide some momentum to get to 3400 and Fed intervention can keep rates low.

Adam Waszkowski, CFA

Honoring Sacrifice

Brendan 1941.JPG

Since the earliest ceremonies in small American towns following the Civil War, we have gathered on Memorial Day to honor and remember those who made the ultimate sacrifice in service to our nation. As in those early days of laying wreaths and placing flags, our national day of remembrance is often felt most deeply among the families and communities who have personally lost friends and loved ones.

Uncle Hubert 1943Since World War I, more than 645,000 men and women have given their lives in defense of our freedom here at home and around the world. 

This national holiday may also be the unofficial start of the summer season, but all Americans must take a moment to remember the sacrifice of our valiant military service members, first responders and their families. Memorial Day is a day of both celebration and grief, accounting for the honor of our heroes and reflecting on their tragic loss.

This Memorial Day, join us in remembering those who bravely sacrificed their lives for our country, including the many first responders of COVID. 

At NAMCOA we pay tribute to Honor, Duty and Sacrifice.