Give your Portfolio a Non-Correlated Gift this Year!

Adding a non-correlated investment theme to a portfolio may be the perfect holiday present this year to consider.

In addition, ESG type investments have become popular because investors want to know the property they own will have a positive impact on the local community and the broader environment. This allows real estate investments to align with what matters most to investors and their families.

One example, is what McLemore is doing in northern Georgia.  Adhering to a strong ESG program, McLemore and its management team strives to provide a profitable return by balancing the Company’s economic goals with good corporate citizenship:

  • Economic Development Incentives: The Company has worked with local and state officials to secure millions of financial incentives.
  • Employment: The Company is targeting over 1,000 new full-time employment opportunities within Walker County, Georgia.
  • Good Stewardship: The Company has remodeled and rebuilt an existing golf course, which now includes the “Best Finishing Hole in America since 2000” by Golf Digest magazine.
  • Visitors: The Company is attracting many more visitors into Walker County, Georgia, where they can enjoy existing parks and protected wilderness areas, including Cloudland Canyon State Park, the Crockford/Pigeon, Mountain Wilderness Area, and many others.
  • The Company is the owner and operator of the McLemore Community, which is an upscale residential golf community that is in the process of developing a Hilton Curio Collection hotel, resort and conference center as well as other amenities. The McLemore Community sits on approximately 825 acres of real property, is located on Lookout Mountain, Georgia and currently consists of the
    many planned components, click here to view the McLemore Executive Summary Overview Deck 10.28.20.

This blog post nor any links above are a solicitation of securities, that may only be performed by a private placement memorandum.  To view McLemore Due Diligence files, including their Private Placement Memorandum and learn more “How to Invest” type information, click here. This offering is for Accredited Investors only. 

Post Election Outlook

Client Note                                                                                                                                                      

November 4, 2020

Pre-election volatility continued in October, with the S&P500 climbing 5%, then dropping some 7% for a net change of about 2.5%.  Gold was a little less volatile and ended the month just slightly lower.  Bond prices trended down all month, with the Aggregate Bond index down less than 1%, while the long bond fell about 3.5%.  Our average moderate portfolio declined by 1.2% on the month, bringing year to date returns to approximately 8.5% for the average portfolio.

The pre-election volatility this year is similar to previous elections.  For the 3 months preceding the election, there have been two increases of about 8% and two declines of 8%.  2016 saw a steadier decline of almost 5% in the 90 days prior to election. 2012 saw a climb of 7% followed by an equal decline.  2020 is not unlike any other year from a market behavior perspective.

Most recently markets have jumped back up (stocks and gold) into the very middle of the past 3 months’ range.  Gold and gold miners also are moving and, as I type, moving up through their respective down channels.   Markets do not like uncertainty and in the immediate term, the longer the count takes the greater the risk of rapid swings in prices.

Looking ahead, the technology sector has been lagging the general market while ‘value’ and dividend paying stocks have performed better over the past week.  The price of oil had a recent bottom on October 29, and since climbed more than 10%.  The energy sector ETF bottomed the next day and has climbed a similar amount.  While not out of the woods yet, as additional stimulus and vaccine data comes out, energy has the most room to make gains as we gain vision to further economic growth in 2021.

However, the gulf between earnings and stock prices remains at historic levels.  Market value of the SP500 vs Total GDP remains higher than in 2000.   As I have stated a few times over the past several months, I still do expect 10-20% swings in stock prices, as we have seen over the past 2 years.  As such, buying relatively ‘low’, after a decline and locking in gains after run-ups is the prescription for continued portfolio growth.

The Federal Reserve has stated quite clearly that its own monetary stimulus is needing the complimentary fiscal stimulus that can only come from Congress.  Given the current state of the Senate, any stimulus is not likely until after the New Year.  The timing of further fiscal stimulus and a widely available vaccine appear to both be pointing to a late first quarter, perhaps mid-year 2021-time frame.  At that time we should be able then to make progress filling in the substantial (greater than 2008 recession) GDP output gap and have better vision as to the rate at which corporate earnings can exceed the 2019 high water mark.

Adam Waszkowski, CFA

 This commentary is not intended as investment advice or an investment recommendation. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results. Price and yield are subject to daily change and as of the specified date. Information provided is solely the opinion or our investment managers at the time of writing. Nothing in the commentary should be construed as a solicitation to buy or sell securities. Information provided has been prepared from sources deemed to be reliable but is not guaranteed by NAMCO and may not be a complete summary or statement of all available data necessary for making an investment decision. Liquid securities, such as those held within managed portfolios, can fall in value. Naples Asset Management Company, LLC is an SEC Registered Investment Adviser. For more information, please contact us at awaszkowski@namcoa.com

The Positive Impact of ESG Investing

ESG type investments have become popular because investors want to know the property they own will have a positive impact on the local community and the broader environment. This allows real estate investments to align with what matters most to investors and their families.

One example, is what McLemore is doing in northern Georgia.  Adhering to a strong ESG program, McLemore and its management team strives to provide a profitable return by balancing the Company’s economic goals with good corporate citizenship:

  • Economic Development Incentives: The Company has worked with local and state officials to secure millions of financial incentives.
  • Employment: The Company is targeting over 1,000 new full-time employment opportunities within Walker County, Georgia.
  • Good Stewardship: The Company has remodeled and rebuilt an existing golf course, which now includes the “Best Finishing Hole in America since 2000” by Golf Digest magazine.
  • Visitors: The Company is attracting many more visitors into Walker County, Georgia, where they can enjoy existing parks and protected wilderness areas, including Cloudland Canyon State Park, the Crockford/Pigeon, Mountain Wilderness Area, and many others.
  • The Company is the owner and operator of the McLemore Community, which is an upscale residential golf community that is in the process of developing a Hilton Curio Collection hotel, resort and conference center as well as other amenities. The McLemore Community sits on approximately 825 acres of real property, is located on Lookout Mountain, Georgia and currently consists of the
    many planned components, click here to view the McLemore Executive Summary Overview Deck 10.28.20.

This blog post nor any links above are a solicitation of securities, that may only be performed by a private placement memorandum.  To view McLemore Due Diligence files, including their Private Placement Memorandum and learn more “How to Invest” type information, click here. This offering is for Accredited Investors only. 

IRS Boosts 2021 Income Limits for Deductible IRA Contributions

The Internal Revenue Service announced Monday income range increases in 2021 for determining eligibility to make deductible contributions to traditional Individual Retirement Arrangements, to contribute to Roth IRAs and to claim the Saver’s Credit.

However, 401(k) contribution limits for 2021 are unchanged at $19,500.

Catch-up contribution limits for employees age 50 and over remain unchanged at $6,500.

The limitation regarding SIMPLE retirement accounts remains unchanged at $13,500.  The limit on annual contributions to an IRA remains unchanged at $6,000.

As the IRS explains in Notice 2020-79, taxpayers can deduct contributions to a traditional IRA if they meet certain conditions. If during the year either the taxpayer or his or her spouse was covered by a retirement plan at work, the deduction may be reduced, or phased out, until it is eliminated, depending on filing status and income. (If neither the taxpayer nor his or her spouse is covered by a retirement plan at work, the phase-outs of the deduction do not apply.)

Here are the phase-out ranges for 2021:

  • For single taxpayers covered by a workplace retirement plan, the phase-out range is $66,000 to $76,000, up from $65,000 to $75,000.
  • For married couples filing jointly, where the spouse making the IRA contribution is covered by a workplace retirement plan, the phase-out range is $105,000 to $125,000, up from $104,000 to $124,000.
  • For an IRA contributor who is not covered by a workplace retirement plan and is married to someone who is covered, the deduction is phased out if the couple’s income is between $198,000 and $208,000, up from $196,000 and $206,000.
  • For a married individual filing a separate return who is covered by a workplace retirement plan, the phase-out range is not subject to an annual cost-of-living adjustment and remains $0 to $10,000. The income limit for the Saver’s Credit (also known as the Retirement Savings Contributions Credit) for low- and moderate-income workers is $66,000 for married couples filing jointly, up from $65,000; $49,500 for heads of household, up from $48,750; and $33,000 for singles and married individuals filing separately, up from $32,500.
  • The income phase-out range for taxpayers making contributions to a Roth IRA is $125,000 to $140,000 for singles and heads of household, up from $124,000 to $139,000. For married couples filing jointly, the income phase-out range is $198,000 to $208,000, up from $196,000 to $206,000. The phase-out range for a married individual filing a separate return who makes contributions to a Roth IRA is not subject to an annual cost-of-living adjustment and remains $0 to $10,000.

The SIMPLE catch-up limit stays unchanged at $13,500. Catch-up contributions do not apply to SEPs.

The 2020 Roth IRA contribution eligibility phase-out limits based on income have increased slightly to $198,000 to $208,000 for married-joint and $125,000 to $140,000 for singles and heads of household.

 

SEC Expands Accredited Investor Definition

The Securities and Exchange Commission Wednesday amended its “accredited investor” definition to allow investors to qualify based on defined measures of professional knowledge, experience or certifications — including holding certain Financial Industry Regulatory Authority licenses — in addition to the existing tests for income or net worth.

The 166-page amendments adopted Wednesday also expand the list of entities that may qualify, including by allowing any entity that meets an “investments test.”

“For the first time, individuals will be permitted to participate in our private capital markets not only based on their income or net worth, but also based on established, clear measures of financial sophistication,” said SEC Chairman Jay Clayton, in a statement. “I am also pleased that we have expanded and updated the list of entities, including tribal governments and other organizations that may qualify to participate in certain private offerings.”

The commission stated that the amendments to the final rule are part of its “ongoing effort to simplify, harmonize, and improve the exempt offering framework, thereby expanding investment opportunities while maintaining appropriate investor protections and promoting capital formation.”

SEC Commissioner Hester Peirce tweeted Wednesday “Americans shouldn’t have to ask the SEC for permission to invest, but today’s accredited investor rule at least offers people a path to ask permission based on their education, rather than simply telling them ‘no, unless you’re rich.’”

In the case of individuals, “the previous rule used wealth — in the form of a certain level of income or net worth — as a proxy for financial sophistication,” the SEC states. However, “we do not believe wealth should be the sole means of establishing financial sophistication of an individual for purposes of the accredited investor definition. Rather, the characteristics of an investor contemplated by the definition can be demonstrated in a variety of ways.”

The thresholds stand at a net worth of at least $1 million excluding the value of primary residence, or income at least $200,000 each year for the last two years (or $300,000 combined income if married).

According to the SEC, the amendments to the accredited investor definition in Rule 501(a):

  • add a new category to the definition that permits natural persons to qualify as accredited investors based on certain professional certifications, designations or credentials, including the Series 7, Series 65, and Series 82 licenses as qualifying natural persons. (The Commission will reevaluate or add certifications, designations or credentials in the future);
  • include as accredited investors, with respect to investments in a private fund, natural persons who are “knowledgeable employees” of the fund;
  • clarify that limited liability companies with $5 million in assets may be accredited investors and add SEC- and state-registered investment advisers, exempt reporting advisers and rural business investment companies (RBICs);
  • add a new category for any entity, including Indian tribes, governmental bodies, funds, and entities organized under the laws of foreign countries;
  • add “family offices” with at least $5 million in assets under management and their “family clients,” as each term is defined under the Investment Advisers Act; and
  • add the term “spousal equivalent” to the accredited investor definition, so that spousal equivalents may pool their finances for the purpose of qualifying as accredited investors.

The amendments also expand the definition of “qualified institutional buyer” in Rule 144A to include LLCs and RIBC programs if they meet the $100 million in securities owned and invested threshold in the definition.

The amendments also add to the list any institutional investors included in the accredited investor definition that are not otherwise enumerated in the definition of “qualified institutional buyer,” the SEC said, provided they satisfy the $100 million threshold.

Client Note June 2020

As we close June and the first half of 2020, financial markets continue their rebound from the first quarter’s corona-crash.  In very volatile markets there will be many “best/worst X since Y”.  The close at 3100 on the SP500 reflects the best quarter in the sp500 since 1987, with a gain of 19.9%.  After a 36% decline off the all-time high and subsequent 40% gain, puts the SP500 at -4% year to date and -9% below the all-time highs.  Our average moderate portfolio gained almost 15% for the quarter and is up 4% on the year.  While further upside is possible but in the short term, US equity markets are in a downtrend since June 23.  On a larger time, frame, we have downtrends since June 8 and off the highs on February 19thGetting over 3200 should open the door towards 3400+, but if we lose the 3000 level, my medium-term outlook will change.  Our individual stocks continue to do very well.

International equities continue to sorely lag US equities.  European shares gained 2.5% on the month, and currently sit at -14% year to date.  Japan gained 1% and China ebbed 1.6% on the month and both fall well short of the SP500 at -7% and -9%, respectively, year to date.  Emerging markets were the winner on the month at +6% but also have made far less progress recovering post-crash, coming in at     -11% year to date. We sold the last bits of emerging and international equities towards the end of the month.

In credit markets, treasuries have dominated over all other areas of the bond markets.  The long bond/20-yr treasury ebbed by 2.25% during the month, is flat for the quarter and up a massive 20% for 2020.  Even with equivalent maturities, treasuries are outpacing investment grade and junk bonds by 5% and 17%(!) respectively.  The investment grade corporate bond etf, LQD is up 5.1% ytd, while junk bond etf, JNK is -7.7% ytd.   This disparity is due to the rapid credit deterioration seen during this severe recession.  Given this, and spike in covid19 cases, its unlikely rates will rise appreciably in the near term.  Our long treasury position was reduced late March at slightly higher prices.

Economic data released in June continue to show improvement over the April/May shutdown (naturally).    The pace at which the economy would rebound after reopening is a hot topic.  We are seeing rapid improvement in some areas but the estimates versus data are showing extremely poor forecasting ability by economists in the short term.  I am watching year over year data to see how much rebound we are getting.  If July and August data show similar growth as May and June, we could see 90% of more of the economy back by Labor Day.  The trend of economic recovery is far more important than the level.  Ideally, we will trend higher and higher until full recovery.   At the end of July, we will get the first read on GDP for the second quarter.  The Atlanta Fed current estimate has risen to   -36%. 

Looking forward, the recent spike in virus cases has opened the door to the risk that the re-opening of the economy will be slowed, as we are more likely to see county or regional shutdowns.  Continued support from the Fed and continuation of stimulus programs are critical.  A bit higher in equities may provide some momentum to get to 3400 and Fed intervention can keep rates low.

Adam Waszkowski, CFA

Honoring Sacrifice

Brendan 1941.JPG

Since the earliest ceremonies in small American towns following the Civil War, we have gathered on Memorial Day to honor and remember those who made the ultimate sacrifice in service to our nation. As in those early days of laying wreaths and placing flags, our national day of remembrance is often felt most deeply among the families and communities who have personally lost friends and loved ones.

Uncle Hubert 1943Since World War I, more than 645,000 men and women have given their lives in defense of our freedom here at home and around the world. 

This national holiday may also be the unofficial start of the summer season, but all Americans must take a moment to remember the sacrifice of our valiant military service members, first responders and their families. Memorial Day is a day of both celebration and grief, accounting for the honor of our heroes and reflecting on their tragic loss.

This Memorial Day, join us in remembering those who bravely sacrificed their lives for our country, including the many first responders of COVID. 

At NAMCOA we pay tribute to Honor, Duty and Sacrifice.