Retirement Plan Custodians

NAMCOA can work with virtually any record-keeper/custodian, as in the case of retirement plans, the plan sponsor has the final choice and selects their record-keeper/custodian. NAMCOA has never received commissions from any custodian, of any type, our competitive fees can be paid out of plan assets and/or be direct-billed. 

In alphabetical offer, the retirement plan custodians we currently work with are:

  • Ascensus
  • AssetMark
  • Empower
  • ePlan
  • Fidelity
  • Paychex
  • SEI Private Trust Company
  • The Pacific Financial Group

Collectively, these custodians are also Platform Managers and provide related investment advisory and performance measurement services that may be provided through their third-party platform. These Platform Managers are responsible for managing model portfolios, taking into account each client risk profile and input from NAMCOA Advisor.

2021 Interactive Broker Awards

So for Interactive Brokers, industry Awards in 2021 are not in any short supply. One of the custodians NAMCOA uses, has achieved yet another award from Barons, for being the Best Online Broker – 5 out of 5 stars#1 for Active Traders, #1 for Information, #1 for International and #1 for Trading.

Interactive Brokers is a global custodian of client assets, and offers a transparent, low commissions and financing rates, support for best price execution, and stock yield enhancement program help minimize costs to maximize client returns.

With Interactive Brokers, our clients can invest globally in stocks, options, futures, currencies, bonds and funds from a single integrated account. Multiple currencies are available and assets can be denominated in multiple currencies.

Through Interactive Brokers, we can access market data 24 hours a day and six days a week in 135 Markets, 33 Countries and 23 currencies.

Other 2021 industry Awards for Interactive Brokers noted below.

Client Note May 2021

June 8, 2021

After a brief pullback in early May, the S&P500 continued is upward grind, managing to eke out a slight gain, .66%, for the month.  Foreign shares did much better with Europe up more than 4% on the month.  Precious metals were the big winners with gold up 7.6% and silver gaining 7.8%   Precious metals outpaced other commodities, which generally fell during May.  Lumber is almost 25% below its peak in early May.  After an initial rise, bond prices were flat as interest rates stabilized. 

We may be seeing the initial switch back to technology and small-cap stock outperformance after a few months of underperformance.  Technology shares fell sharply early in the month and despite a solid rebound ended down 1.2% on the month.  However, since mid-May, the value-over-growth meme that we have seen the past few months has begun to reverse.  Small stocks and tech have begun outpacing cyclicals/value.   I expect this to continue through the summer.   Stocks remain in an uptrend.  Technology and small companies are seeing prices revived; gold has caught back up to equities and interest rates have been easing.   Sentiment indicators have moved from short term negative to neutral.  For me, this means the market has room to move up as it climbs a ‘wall of worry’ regarding inflation.  Once no one is worried, and everyone has ‘bought in’, THEN we need to be concerned as there will be fewer buyers left to buy.

The main, seemingly only topic, in the news is inflation and the employment situation.  The current narrative is that inflation is being caused not only by supply chain issues, but also by wage pressures.  The idea behind wage pressures is that, if wages continue to climb, prices for goods and services will increase as well, resulting in inflation. 

There is littlereason to think that the pace of wage increases coming out of the recession will continue to climb at the current pace after this summer.   We still have more than 7 million fewer people working than at the end of 2020.   During the recession low wage areas like food service and hospitality bore the brunt of the layoffs.  As people leave unemployment benefits, their new wages will be very similar to the benefits they have been receiving.  Some may earn less.  We are now seeing the peak of wage gains and expectations.  Upward pressure will ease over the summer hiring season ends and bottlenecks dissipate.

The key idea is that wages and prices dropped dramatically and have now rebounded.  This base effect, comparing last year to this year is very substantial.  The error is assuming this pace of gain will continue. The rate of increase in employment, wages, inflation and possibly, earnings will likely level off and slow.  How stock prices react in that environment will be interesting.  Sustained higher stock prices due to low inflation/low interest rates, or will slower growth be seen as a risk to earnings and thus stock prices.

Adam Waszkowski, CFA

Advisory and Consulting Services offered through NAMCOA® (Naples Asset Management Company®, LLC ). NAMCOA is a SEC Registered Investment Adviser. Information presented is for educational purposes only for a broad audience.  The information does not intend to make an offer or solicitation f​or the sale or purchase of any specific securities, investments, or investment strategies. Investments involve risk and are not guaranteed. NAMCOA® has reasonable belief that this marketing does not include any false or material misleading statements or omissions of facts regarding services, investment, or client experience. NAMCOA® has reasonable belief that the content as a whole will not cause an untrue or misleading implication regarding the adviser’s services, investments or client experiences.  Please refer to our Firm Brochure (ADV2) for material risks disclosures. Performance of any specific investment advice should not be relied upon without knowledge of certain circumstances of market events, nature and timing of the investments and relevant constraints of the investment. NAMCOA® has presented information in a fair and balanced manner. The opinions expressed herein are those of the firm and are subject to change without notice. The opinions referenced are as of the date of publication and are subject to change due to changes in the market or economic conditions and may not necessarily come to pass.  Any opinions, projections, or forward-looking statements expressed herein are solely those of author, may differ from the views or opinions expressed by other areas of the firm, and are only for general informational purposes as of the date indicated.  NAMCOA® may discuss and display, charts, graphs, formulas and stock picks which are not intended to be used by themselves to determine which securities to buy or sell, or when to buy or sell them. Such charts and graphs offer limited information and should not be used on their own to make investment decisions. Consultation with a licensed financial professional is strongly suggested. Please remember that securities cannot be purchased, sold or traded via e-mail or voice message system.  For more information, please visit www.namcoa.com

Client Note April 2021

May 10, 2021

The close of April brings us 1/3 of the way through 2021.  After a very rapid start in January and subsequent pullback, April was a strong month across all asset classes.  For the month, the S&P500 gained 5.8%, gold gained 3.8%, corporate bonds gained 1% and long-term Treasuries gained 2.4%. Stocks in Asia have weakened while European shares have been catching up to the US.  Portfolios gained in April and the average Moderate portfolio is up 6% year to date.

We are still in a “value over growth” market, where traditional industries like materials, industrials, financials, utilities are outpacing the growth areas like technology and biotech.  We had been in a market were large-cap growth” (aka technology, aka FAANG) and small-cap stocks had been dominating, but since mid-February markets have been driven by dividend paying stocks and other cyclical areas.  This will likely continue until evidence that we are not going to grow as rapidly as investors currently believe.   Friday’s massive miss in unemployment (1million new jobs expected; 266,000 actual) may be the first data point that could show a much more moderate pace of growth going forward.

The still high expectations of rapid growth see inflation data as evidence that the economy is about to run red-hot.   If we read below the headlines, we can see that commodity prices like lumber are being driven by more than US housing demand.  A years-ago beetle infestation in Canada has limited US lumber imports; sawmill shutdowns due to Covid, AND housing have been sources of supply disruption.  The combination has pushed prices to extreme levels.  China is the world’s largest consumer of raw materials.  China’s early control of Covid-19 and truly massive stimulus spending (approximately 10% of GDP in 2020) has underpinned demand for such commodities and agricultural products.    This makes much more sense than inflation driven by US aspirations to get back to pre-Covid levels, which saw sub-2% growth for several years.  In addition, supply chain disruption due to a varied array of local shutdown conditions across the US has made year over year comparisons and identifying specific bottlenecks a challenge.   Currently, China’s credit impulse is on the wane, while US stimulus takes the reins in 2021.  US stimulus usually takes longer to impact the economy, however.  In the longer run, the US needs to maintain our reserve currency status—by creating enough US dollars for the rest of the world to use—but that is a topic for another day.

I expect forward-looking estimates of growth in the US to decline to more normal levels and at the same time, interest rates and inflation expectations to decline moderately.  Interest rates have been sideways now for almost 10 weeks. I will be looking for further confirmation of this in economic data into the end of the quarter.

 

Adam Waszkowski, CFA

 This commentary is not intended as investment advice or an investment recommendation. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results. Price and yield are subject to daily change and as of the specified date. Information provided is solely the opinion or our investment managers at the time of writing. Nothing in the commentary should be construed as a solicitation to buy or sell securities. Information provided has been prepared from sources deemed to be reliable but is not guaranteed by NAMCO and may not be a complete summary or statement of all available data necessary for making an investment decision. Liquid securities, such as those held within managed portfolios, can fall in value. Naples Asset Management Company, LLC is an SEC Registered Investment Adviser. For more information, please contact us at awaszkowski@namcoa.com.

Client Note February 2021

March 2, 2021

February was a bit of a roller coaster, as the S&P 500 gained 6.5% into mid-month, then fell back 3.5% to end with a monthly gain of 2.7%, and year to date at 1.6%.   Gold continued its drawdown, losing almost 10% year to date.   Interest rates have been rising for over a year now.  The rise in rates, news of commodity gains (rising for year as well), and thus inflation concerns are in the headlines which likely means we are likely to see a reversal in these trends of some degree soon.

With our current and recent equity exposure overweight energy and technology we have been able to offset the negative impacts of bonds and precious metals, providing year to date gains for moderate and aggressive portfolios.  Conservative portfolios will likely get in the game as interest rates pull back.

Inflation, ‘reflation-trade’, and the rise in interest rates lately is very much in the news.  All have been rising since the market crash in Spring of 2020.  Recent readings remain below pre-covid levels.  In September 2019, the CPI index was rising at 1.75% annual rate and the 10-year Treasury bond yielded 1.7%.  Today we see 1.4% inflation and 1.41% on the 10year Treasury.  CPI has been at 1.2%-1.4% since August.    While the inflation rate has remained relatively flat, market interest rates after initially lagging inflation have caught up recently.  This recent surge in rates catching up, is what is in the news.  

What drives market rates are expectations of inflation.  Vaccine roll-out and a dramatic decline in deaths and hospitalizations is allowing for predictions of robust growth to gain traction.  The assumption is that mass vaccinations will allow people to return to work, earn and spend money, growing the economy to pre-covid levels (2007-2019 GDP averaged 2.3% annually).  I have doubts as to how quickly we will get back to pre-covid employment levels.    Here in Florida, we have had in-school teaching since August and bars and restaurants fully open back in September.  Since then, the Florida unemployment rate dropped from 7.3% to 6.1% in December.  The US unemployment rate went from 8.4% to 6.7%.   There may not be significant improvement in employment nationally for quite some time.  But in the very near term, a new round of stimulus will go out in March and impact short term spending and income statistics just as the first stimulus did, potentially giving us a false read on how strong incomes and spending are, and thus an ‘overshoot’ on inflation and interest rates.

Inflation is a slow moving, long term phenomenon.  Over the long term, stocks and gold hold their value against inflation.  For income investors the days of the bond mutual fund are over.  Buying short term bonds to hold to maturity then reinvesting the principle into another bond as rates rise is a short to medium term strategy.   The rise in rates has overshot inflation, and longer term were likely to remain range bound between 1.5% and .9% on the 10-year treasury. Right now, I am not seeing any scenario of rapid uncontrolled increase in inflation or interest rates.

Adam Waszkowski, CFA

 This commentary is not intended as investment advice or an investment recommendation. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results. Price and yield are subject to daily change and as of the specified date. Information provided is solely the opinion or our investment managers at the time of writing. Nothing in the commentary should be construed as a solicitation to buy or sell securities. Information provided has been prepared from sources deemed to be reliable but is not guaranteed by NAMCO and may not be a complete summary or statement of all available data necessary for making an investment decision. Liquid securities, such as those held within managed portfolios, can fall in value. Naples Asset Management Company, LLC is an SEC Registered Investment Adviser. For more information, please contact us at awaszkowski@namcoa.com.

Client Note December 2020

January 12, 2021

2020, despite a massive pandemic and a severe global recession, central banks, with some fiscal assistance from governments, have managed to keep financial asset prices elevated.  Significant declines in revenues, profits and employment arguably the worst since the 1930’s alongside surging stock index price levels, have conspired to give us the most overvalued market since 1929 or 2000 (some argue “ever”).    How long can this endure?  Depends on when central banks begin to whisper about ‘normalization’.

For 2020, the SP500 gained 18.4%, the aggregate bond index gained 7.5%, and gold gained 26%.  European shares eked out a positive year while the Asian indexes fared very well.  My conservative portfolios gained mid to upper single digits while the average moderate portfolio gained a bit more than 13% on the year.   The pullback in Moderna and precious metals provided a weak end and lackluster start to the year.    The energy sector was the worst sector in the SP500, losing 28% and the tech sector fared the best gaining 48%.  Healthcare and energy are likely to be strong outperformers in 2021.  The addition of TSLA to the SP500 has increased the risk of market volatility. Past observances of new additions to the index show they generally perform worse than prior to their addition.  TSLAs outrageous market value (valued more than the 9 largest global auto makers combined; selling at 28x sales) and the 7th largest company in the index, put the index and any sector it is in at risk of increased volatility.

Gold and gold miners are at risk of starting another correction.  Recent lows at Thanksgiving are being approached.  The rally from late November to January 6 was the largest run up since gold’s consolidation began in August.  However, IF we can hold the longer-term uptrend, upside potential is significant.   Bonds too, are seeing prices under pressure as metals/lumber/agriculture/oil prices’ surge is generating calls of “Inflation!”.   It’s quite early to claim prices are going up due to renewed growth.

Asia came out of the COVID-19 lockdowns much quicker and effectively than western nations.  This re-opening (as a result of very stringent testing/tracing/ and effective lockdowns) allowed those economies to re-stock and re-open driving up demand and prices for raw commodities.   From 2015 to late 2017 base metal prices and oil were moving up quickly.  Cries of inflation were heard then as well.  Inflation never showed up (unless you count 2.1% as INFLATION).  This is due directly to US consumer spending growth, or lack thereof.

Aggregate consumer spending is significantly below trend.    Dig a little deeper and you can see many economic indicators picked up in 2015 through 2017, then rolled over during summer 2018, after the brief impact of tax reform (most of the benefits went to the top where additional money isn’t spent). Current total annual spending was $14.8trillion and growing at 4.2% for the past few years (income at almost the exact same rate).  MOST recently spending has declined the past few months while aggregate income also is declining.  Today we can see the next few months will likely show a spending gap of $1trillion.  A $1trillion gap is almost 7% of total spending and reflects the concurrent GDP output gap and an outright decline in GDP of around 4% year over year.  Looking ahead, the real problem may lie in the US inability to deal with the virus effectively.  Yesterday, an article stated that in Ohio, 50% of nursing home workers are refusing the vaccine.   Layer in low compliance with mask mandates (>70% compliance in order to be effective), and I truly wonder if an end to the virus is, in fact, in the offing.

As a consumer driven economy, the point is, while one can find prices of products higher (or packaging smaller at the same price), we spent a lot less in 2020 and will continue into 2021.  And unless personal spending increases, we should not see a difference in the economy or inflation going forward.  This may bode well for bonds.  TLT the 20-yr treasury bond elf, gained more than 15% in 2020, but has fallen a similar amount off its highs this summer.  Expectations for higher rates may have gotten ahead of itself and we could be near a low in prices.  Layer in the fact that bets against prices are near extremes may indicate the decline in bond prices is nearing an end.

In addition, or perhaps running parallel to the decline in spending is the truly massive amount of people on unemployment insurance.  In 2006, Continuing Claims for unemployment insurance hit a low of 2.35 million.  This began to increase in early 2007 and hit a high of 6.62million in June 2009, after the Great Financial Crisis. By June 2010, this fell to below 4.5million, and continued to decline into October 2018 to 1.65million. Claims remained flat until February 2020.  May 9, 2020 claims hit 24.91million.  And over the past 8 months has receded to only 5.1million.  It was only in November that our current Continuing Claims for Unemployment Insurance fell below the GFR Peak in 2010.  The number and duration of unemployment today has not been seen in the post WWII era.  Fortunately, today, we have unemployment insurance and a Federal Reserve acting to support financial markets (almost perpetually since 2009).

We should not expect any kind of normalization in the economy or improving numbers at least until employment, and thusly spending, improve rapidly.  This is completely dependent upon containing the spread of covid-19.

Due to the length and depth of the declines in spending and employment, the longer-term collateral damage will not be seen until things begin to normalize. Once all the rent and loan deferments, PPP loans, random stimulus checks, and enhanced unemployment benefits disappear we will be able to see the extent of the long -term damage.   Ironically, that knowledge will come at the same time we declare victory over this virus-recession and may be concurrent with a market decline.

In the meantime, let us hope the Fed does not mention ANYthing about tapering the current $120billion per month they are pumping into the financial markets, hoping that the Wealth Effect is more than theory.  So, while prices continue to climb, we will participate and listen intently for any signs the Fed is “confident” enough to reduce the variety of market interventions currently underway.

 

Adam Waszkowski, CFA

This commentary is not intended as investment advice or an investment recommendation. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results. Price and yield are subject to daily change and as of the specified date. Information provided is solely the opinion or our investment managers at the time of writing. Nothing in the commentary should be construed as a solicitation to buy or sell securities. Information provided has been prepared from sources deemed to be reliable but is not guaranteed by NAMCO and may not be a complete summary or statement of all available data necessary for making an investment decision. Liquid securities, such as those held within managed portfolios, can fall in value. Naples Asset Management Company, LLC is an SEC Registered Investment Adviser. For more information, please contact us at awaszkowski@namcoa.com.